Guide Cinema and Society in the British Empire, 1895-1940 (Britain and the World)

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    Cinema and Society in the British Empire, 1895-1940

    Music Memorabilia 2. Format see all Format. All listings filter applied. The German colonial empire did not last very long in the 20 th century compared against the British empire which effectively ended in The German empire simply was not around when a mature cinema developed after World War I.

    But its brief existence did coincide with the origins and early years of cinema from the s to What makes the work even more significant is that most of the visual material Fuhrmann references no longer exists so he had to carefully piece together the content of the films under discussion by examining newspaper accounts, official summations, and audience reaction. Such diligence has produced the definitive work on colonial cinema and early film culture in Germany which, Fuhrmann argues, are inseparable.

    Fuhrmann has organized his book into five parts and fourteen chapters.


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    Parts One and Two discuss colonial cinema in the context of the German variety theatre and the DKG Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft—German Colonial Society , the principle organization for the promotion of the German colonies. The DKG was convinced of the superiority of film in promoting the colonies.

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    DKG lecture halls were the preferred venue for colonial films until , when the growth of film distribution led to colonial films appearing in local theatres. Part Three uses the case study of Karl Weule to show how colonial cinema could make ethnographic material of indigenous people available to both colonial administrators and the German Public, many of whom watched less for the science than for the bare-breasted African women.

    Part Four examines colonial films in public cinemas. Here cinema owners had to address a varied audience. This led to less ethnographic films and more overtly racist travelogues such as Die Wilden beim Eisenbahn The Savages Constructing Railway While most films were racist, the films on hunting big game in Africa did take an unexpected turn.

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    Parts Four and Five shift the focus from non-fiction films to feature length fiction films. So it went with, melodramatic racist colonial potboilers that allowed the audience to identify with the white hero or the suffering and passionate heroine.